Great Writers/Books

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~Zesdy~
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Great Writers/Books

Postby ~Zesdy~ » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 07:06 pm

There was a discussion, not too long ago, in one of the threads, regarding the difference between good storytellers and great writers. Well, I want to be entrenched with great books from great writers. Yes, I enjoy a good story/book

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Postby Lowdoggy Dogg » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 08:20 pm

This is a good thread. I don't know that I can add anything right now, but I'll think about it.

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Postby Zapato » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 09:07 pm

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak comes to mind, as far as communicating with the characters in the book by shouting at the pages goes.

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Postby Momma Snider » Sun 01 Mar, 2009 10:40 pm

I have to return to Madeleine L'Engle. Whether it's her books for young people or her adult novels, she keeps my attention, and I think she's a great writer.

Also CS Lewis.

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Postby AdamOndi » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 09:25 am

I suppose it depends on the genres you like best. "Snow Falling On Cedars" is a mystery, right? I don't have a lot of suggestions on the mystery genre, but I do have some excellent writers in mind for some other genres.

For epic fantasy, it's hard to do much better than Robert Jordan. For a grittier epic fantasy, George R.R. Martin is a great writer. If you want something that is gritty fantasy but is not as long as the epic stuff, then Joe Abercrombie is an excellent choice. And for fantasy stuff that is not all gritty, but is endlessly whimsical and enjoyable, read anything by Neil Gaiman. Specifically, "Stardust" and "Anansi Boys."

For SciFi, Orson Scott Card is widely renowned as a great writer. His Ender books are known far and wide. And, of course, there are the other classic SciFi authors like Arthur C. Clarke and Larry Niven.

For espionage thrillers, check out Robert Ludlum. He is the author who created Jason Borne way back in the 70's. As much as I love the Borne movies, I think I like the original Borne Identity book even more.

Those are my suggestions in the genres that I enjoy most.
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Postby KMD » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 10:16 am

I recently read "Good Omens", and I believe that was Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett working together, and it was great. I've been a Pratchett fan for a long time, now I'm going to have to go read some more Gaiman.
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Postby ~Zesdy~ » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 12:21 pm

Thanks for the input so far. I am going to make a list of the suggestions that I haven't read and read 'em one at a time.

I talked to my mom about this last night and she had some suggestions as well. I want to put 'em here. Moby Dick by Herman Melville (I've had it in my possession for an embarrassingly long time and still haven't started it.) She highly recommended works from author William Faulkner... especially one story about a guy you had an awful father. I can't remember the title. And she told me I would enjoy "Water for Elephants."

As far as genre goes (good point, AdamOndi) I read from all of them. My taste in books is similar to my taste in music. I listen to everything. There was a time where I didn't like country music... but then I got a divorce and suddenly I understood. :)

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Postby Benny » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 03:46 pm

To Kill a Mockingbird is still my favorite, and beautifully written book that, sadly, is often ruined by children being forced to read at grade-point.

The beauty of this book can't be understood at duress.

Or Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. Very prose-y. Bradury's version of Remembrance of Things Lost
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Postby AdamOndi » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 04:53 pm

Benny wrote:To Kill a Mockingbird is still my favorite, and beautifully written book that, sadly, is often ruined by children being forced to read at grade-point.

The beauty of this book can't be understood at duress.

Or Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. Very prose-y. Bradury's version of Remembrance of Things Lost


Yeah, I was not all that impressed with TKAM because I was forced to read it in junior high. And then the teacher tried to cram what she felt were the most important themes from the book down our throats, too. Over and over.

Bradbury's work is often ruined by the forced reading in English class, too. I had to read Fahrenheit 451 in my Sophomore English class, and I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more, had I not been compelled to read it.

Sometimes I wonder how I would have felt about all of the required reading had I not been required to read it and parrot stuff back about it.
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Postby KareNin » Mon 02 Mar, 2009 10:53 pm

Well, I just cannot pass up an opportunity to plug my dear friend, (though we have never met and he does not even know I exist) Alexander McCall Smith. He is just the most charming Scotsman; author of the "No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" series, set in Botswana; the Isabel Dalhousie series and the "44 Scotland Street" series (set in Edinburgh). Also, he just finished a 100-chapter online-only novel published in the Telegraph, called "Corduroy Mansions."

Anything by Elizabeth Berg, or Anne Tyler, or Madeleine L'Engle, or Anita Shreve.

It's late and I can't think of any more right now... I remember recommending "Water For Elephants" to Binky several months back, so yeah.
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Postby The Don » Tue 03 Mar, 2009 12:14 pm

AdamOndi wrote:
Benny wrote:To Kill a Mockingbird is still my favorite, and beautifully written book that, sadly, is often ruined by children being forced to read at grade-point.

The beauty of this book can't be understood at duress.

Or Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. Very prose-y. Bradury's version of Remembrance of Things Lost


Yeah, I was not all that impressed with TKAM because I was forced to read it in junior high. And then the teacher tried to cram what she felt were the most important themes from the book down our throats, too. Over and over.

Bradbury's work is often ruined by the forced reading in English class, too. I had to read Fahrenheit 451 in my Sophomore English class, and I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more, had I not been compelled to read it.

Sometimes I wonder how I would have felt about all of the required reading had I not been required to read it and parrot stuff back about it.


That is unfortunate because Farenheit 451 is an absolutely brilliant novel. I would also recommend Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury.

Another author who has written some truly stellar stuff is Gabriel Garcia Marquez. I would heartily recommend 100 Years of Solitude.
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Postby steelem » Tue 03 Mar, 2009 03:26 pm

For storytelling and writing, I like Margaret Atwood. Good stuff.
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Postby Lowdoggy Dogg » Wed 04 Mar, 2009 09:51 am

I enjoy almost anything by Alexander McCall Smith. The plots of his stories are small in scope but the way he writes people and how they think is exceptional.

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Postby The Don » Wed 22 Apr, 2009 04:00 pm

For the Robert Jordan fans out there I dont know if you've seen the press release yet: http://www.dragonmount.com/News/?p=483, but the final book(s) in the Wheel of Time series has been officially announced.

What is amusing about this (at least to me) is that Brandon Sanderson (the guy hired to finish the series out after Robert Jordan died) in order to be faithful to the material, write a good story, and tie things up nicely says the final manuscript will be in the 800k word range which means that the last book will be, in fact, three books.

Ah Robert Jordan, you certainly thought big didn't you.
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Postby Lowdoggy Dogg » Wed 22 Apr, 2009 06:44 pm

How many books are in that series?

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Postby The Don » Wed 22 Apr, 2009 07:18 pm

This final book (split into three parts) will be the 12th book in the series.
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Postby AdamOndi » Thu 23 Apr, 2009 12:01 pm

So, in reality, the series will end up being a total of 14 books. They can call the last three A Memory of Light followed by unique subtitles for each of the three books if they want, but that doesn't change the fact that each one will be a full book in its own right. 300K words is a pretty decent-sized book on its own, after all. Especially when you consider the fact that The Eye of the World (book 1 of the Wheel of Time) is pretty sizable, and it is just shy of 306K words.

Plus, Brandon Sanderson has announced that each of the last three books will have its own cohesive plot complete with satisfying climaxes. They might as well forget about trying to do the whole subtitling thing altogether.

I am just happy that there will be a new WoT book this Fall. I want to get on with seeing how the story ends, darn it. And I really like Brandon's other stuff, so I am confident that he can do well with the WoT completion, too.
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Postby The Don » Thu 23 Apr, 2009 12:05 pm

I'm stoked too for the new book and the coming conclusion of the series.
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Postby Binky » Fri 01 May, 2009 01:13 pm

I just finished Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book (in one sitting--I couldn't put it down) and I love-love-LOVED it.
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Postby Lady Celtic » Sat 02 May, 2009 12:43 pm

That is an excellent book. I agree.
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