Are you guys really supposed to keep a years supply of food

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Sun 14 Sep, 2008 06:28 pm

So, Sara, are you saying you didn't can that cheese that you stored? I read the article about canning it, and I was intrigued, but it sounds like you just put yours on the shelf?

I couldn't do that, because we don't have a basement and it gets way too hot in the garage or the closets in the house, but I might try canning it. For that matter, I could freeze it, I guess. Life is always better if there's plenty of cheese.

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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Tue 16 Sep, 2008 12:35 pm

I haven't tried the vinegar and Ziploc idea yet because every time I buy the cheese, I eat it.

A neighbor is interested in the idea for a homeschoolers group, but she wants me to find supporting documentation on it and I haven't found any yet in my short-attention-span googling.
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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Tue 16 Sep, 2008 01:11 pm

Never mind. Found it.
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KareNin
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Postby KareNin » Tue 16 Sep, 2008 02:11 pm

Sara, I like your blog a lot. Thanks for stepping up to the plate!

Our experiences over the past 3 days have brought up a quite different reminder, however: Don't rely TOO much on your freezer for your food storage...unless you also have a generator and a lot of fuel stored.

Hurricane Ike was WAYYYYYYYYY down in the Gulf Coast area, right? We don't GET hurricanes up here in Ohio. But...

Sunday afternoon, from a very calm day, we began getting very strong winds; within a few minutes they were EXTREMELY strong gusts, and sustained winds. It was like a gigantic blow dryer began passing over the area. Branches snapped off trees and blew through the air, if you were outside, you could barely stand up--NOBODY in the area had ever seen such wind, for so long, and in the next couple of hours, there was shrieking wind, horizontally-driven rain, howling wind, trees uprooted, roof sections blown off, and all sorts of assorted destruction. Yep, we got "the remnants of Ike," and hundreds of thousands of Ohioans lost their electricity. Ours was out from about 4pm Sunday until today, Tuesday morning, at 10:45 am. Some people are STILL without power, and this is in an area thousands of miles from Hurricane Ike's main target.

My niece lives in The Woodlands near Houston, and the officials are estimating that it could be "a couple of weeks" before power is restored there.

I was worrying about the possible loss of the contents of our 2 fridge/freezer combos, but we kept them closed with only a couple of quick exceptions, and it looks like everything is okay. But if the power had been off much longer, we would have lost a considerable amount of food.

So, just please remember the old advice not to "put all your eggs in one basket." Mixing it up with food storage methods so the greatest proportion of it is not vulnerable to sudden loss seems wise to me.

(Edited to add:) One unexpected benefit of this is that we now have approximately 2.5 cords of good firewood, cut and stacked, ready to dry and season for emergency fireplace fuel for Winter '09-'10. And an unrestricted view of our neighbor's workshop. And a new chain saw.
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The Don
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Postby The Don » Wed 17 Sep, 2008 08:51 am

KareNin wrote:Sunday afternoon, from a very calm day, we began getting very strong winds; within a few minutes they were EXTREMELY strong gusts, and sustained winds. It was like a gigantic blow dryer began passing over the area. Branches snapped off trees and blew through the air, if you were outside, you could barely stand up--NOBODY in the area had ever seen such wind, for so long, and in the next couple of hours, there was shrieking wind, horizontally-driven rain, howling wind, trees uprooted, roof sections blown off, and all sorts of assorted destruction. Yep, we got "the remnants of Ike," and hundreds of thousands of Ohioans lost their electricity. Ours was out from about 4pm Sunday until today, Tuesday morning, at 10:45 am. Some people are STILL without power, and this is in an area thousands of miles from Hurricane Ike's main target.


That pretty much mirrors our experience. Not as bad as Texas by any means but still incredibly surprising for this part of the country. We had gusts up to 78 mph. After the storm passed we went out to survey the damage. It was fascinating. My in-laws who live just a few minutes away had three trees go down all just barely missing their house.
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Postby Coolboyharrell » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 12:13 pm

I get the feeling that a years-worth of food storage is going to come in handy really, really soon. Who's got some resources for me of how poor people can start to build up a stockpile of emergency food without too much stress?
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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 04:40 pm

Peanut butter! Buy some peanut butter and some crackers to keep on a shelf somewhere.

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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 05:12 pm

Coolboyharrell wrote:I get the feeling that a years-worth of food storage is going to come in handy really, really soon.

I had a dream this morning at about 5am that said our family needed to finish preparing today and to remain happy and optimistic during the preparation. When I have dreams like that, by golly, my husband listens.
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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 06:31 pm

That happy and optimistic thing is crucial, in my opinion. The whole point is that yes, times will get hard, but being prepared will help. With all the bad things that are happening in the world, there are also more and more temples being built, more people coming to Christ, and miracles never cease, and the hard times will end with the actual coming to earth of Jesus Christ! What could be better than that? This is a hard time to be alive, but also a wonderful time to be alive.

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Postby Coolboyharrell » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 06:35 pm

And as long as I've got some peanut butter and some crackers, we're going to slither through this baby like...never mind.
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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 07:47 pm

Momma Snider wrote:This is a hard time to be alive, but also a wonderful time to be alive.

Yep.
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Postby Jersey Girl » Tue 30 Sep, 2008 07:59 pm

I usually try to buy a couple extra things when I'm grocery shopping. If I find tomato sauce or soup is on sale, I'll buy a few more cans than I would normally use. I'm a slacker about grocery shopping lately and that has gotten me through my weeks. The only thing I wish I had more of is freezer space, but with four roommates that ain't going to happen.

Under your bed is a great place to store food.

Do I have a years supply no? I have a few weeks if I need to live that way. My ward has a list of things we should buy every week for our years supply. If you handle it in small quantities, it is a less overwhelming thought.

I think at this point, having extra cash on hand is a good idea as well as a little extra for a rainy day. Here's some counsel from President Monson and President Hinckley. It truly testifies how important it is to follow a prophet because both these talks are three to four years old.

I'm not even going to broach the topic of Matthew 24.
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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Mon 06 Jul, 2009 09:52 am

Sara without the H wrote:So I put 2 5-lb blocks of Tillamook mild cheddar cheese on my basement shelf last January. Tillamook cheese has a thick plastic wrapper that keeps the air out. I didn't do the Ziplock and vinegar idea mentioned earlier in the thread, since I forgot about that part until now.

We opened one of them up in June. The cheese had gotten sharper and yummier, and that was the only difference.


I went to an emergency preparedness workshop at our Stake R.S. Enrichment and someone else mentioned Tillamook kept better. They also showed us how to store hard cheeses indefinitely using cheesewax and I think I'm going that route. It seemed more consistent and they keep for about 25 years. (Not that they will escape my tastebuds for that long.)

Anyone else still working on their emergency preparedness? What part are you working on now?
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SDR
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Postby SDR » Tue 07 Jul, 2009 11:35 pm

My wife and I bought a couple of buckets of packed dehydrated meals at our Costco a couple months ago. Advertised to have a 20 year shelf life. Forty packets of five meals each for a total of 200 meals per bucket. It includes an assortment of meals, including breakfasts, for $60 or $70 per bucket. Gotta make sure you have water on hand to be completely prepared to use it, obviously, but it could be useful as is if the only problem was that money was tight. 400 meals, and it only takes the room of two five gallon buckets.

It's not the ultimate in preparedness, but it was simple and it makes me feel a little better. That and the year supply I carry with me, of course.

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Lady Celtic
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Postby Lady Celtic » Wed 08 Jul, 2009 10:21 am

We got one of those for Christmas last year. Eases my mind a bit, as we haven't got the resources or the space for a full-on year's storage.
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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Wed 08 Jul, 2009 11:19 am

We have been looking at buying some packaged dehydrated meals, but they are $1500 for a three-month supply for a family of five, which means maybe six months for us. I think I'll see if our Costco has those buckets instead.

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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Wed 15 Jul, 2009 07:32 am

SDR wrote: That and the year supply I carry with me, of course.


I JUST got that. You are awful!

The latest:
We bought four 55-gallon barrels ($15 each), one 30-gallon barrel ($15), and one 15-gallon barrel ($10) to add to our water storage. This will mostly be the hygiene/cooking water. I found this water preserver online that helps the water stay good for at least 5 years so I won't have to rotate the water in the large containers so often. (Phew!)

I also ordered 5 pounds of cheesewax that should be arriving today, (Hooray!) and have 10-lbs of cheddar and 5-lbs of mozzarella waiting in the fridge for it.
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SDR
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Postby SDR » Wed 15 Jul, 2009 09:20 am

ImAdhis wrote:
SDR wrote: That and the year supply I carry with me, of course.


I JUST got that. You are awful!


Wow, I've been called a lot of things, but I don't think awful is one of them. At least not to my "face". :)

You aren't one of my ex-wives, are you? I don't think so, but it would explain the "awful" comment so well... ;)

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KareNin
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Postby KareNin » Wed 15 Jul, 2009 09:52 am

SDR wrote:
ImAdhis wrote:
SDR wrote: That and the year supply I carry with me, of course.


I JUST got that. You are awful!

I think Adhis just got distracted and forgot to finish her sentence. She probably meant to say, "You are awfully clever!" Because, as studies show, skinny people with little to no fat reserves on their bones don't fare very well in a famine.

So, when food is scarce, and all the impossibly perfectly toned, lean, supermodel types are staggering around, gasping with raggedy breath out of their silicone-plumped lips, "I'm STAAARRRVVVING...please...can you spare me a crumb of bread?" all of us chunky, extra-large, 2X,3X, fatty fatty two-by-four types WHO PLAN AHEAD, will be patting our Nutrition Reserves fondly and musing, "Hmmm, you know, I am starting to feel a mite peckish...Oh, but the carbs in a bread crumb will make you swell up like a beach ball. Here, you can have this core from the head of lettuce; I was going to throw it out anyway."
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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Wed 15 Jul, 2009 10:41 am

Oops, I forget sometimes things don't translate in outerweb as I use them off-the-web.

When someone says, "Ugh- my hair looks like the bastard child of a brillo pad and poodle," I'd say "You're awful!" give the chum a playful shove, laugh, and then carry on with the conversation as usual.

I'm hoping maybe you knew that already and just decided to give this munchkin Latina a hard time today.
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