Are you guys really supposed to keep a years supply of food

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deepdish
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Postby deepdish » Fri 02 Sep, 2005 06:23 am

Slash, I understand that you're curious (and I have no problem with that), but is it really that strange after all? To me, being prepared ahead of time for whatever the onslaught ends up being is preferable to the alternative.

Here at my place it's stacked nicely in boxes and takes up the 1/2 part of my 2 1/2-car garage. Most of what we have is new, so we don't do much rotation yet.

Oh, and as for the floodwaters, almost all of my stuff is sealed in cans so they'd survive being underwater short-term. As long as my can opener doesn't float away...

Chad

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Fri 02 Sep, 2005 08:34 am

I was just realizing this morning that we kind of skipped the comment that food storage for the people in New Orleans is under water and so is doing them no good. That's true, but how about those in outlying areas, who aren't totally flooded out but don't have electricity, or the stores have been closed or sold out of necessities? If they've stored some stuff, they're better off. They're also able to share, maybe send some of their stuff to the Astrodome or someplace.

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georgebrat
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Postby georgebrat » Fri 02 Sep, 2005 10:32 am

Momma Snider wrote:That's true, but how about those in outlying areas, who aren't totally flooded out but don't have electricity, or the stores have been closed or sold out of necessities? If they've stored some stuff, they're better off. They're also able to share, maybe send some of their stuff to the Astrodome or someplace.


And listening to the news last night (really late I might add) People were doing that exact thing. Having neighborhood dinners and things. Inviting all who were around to come and eat and rationing things they had in low supply.

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Slash the Berzerker
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Postby Slash the Berzerker » Fri 02 Sep, 2005 03:02 pm

but is it really that strange after all?


The quantity seems... unusual. Having some supplies is a great idea. The logistics of maintaining a years worth are what drew my attention. Just, in general, a years worth of food is a huge amount.

I was just realizing this morning that we kind of skipped the comment that food storage for the people in New Orleans is under water and so is doing them no good.


I think you misunderstand what I was saying there. I was not saying that the fact that a flood might bury your supplies makes having supplies a bad idea. I was saying that in addition to losing everything they own in the world, they ALSO lost their disaster supplies. Seems like adding insult to injury.
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nick
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Postby nick » Fri 02 Sep, 2005 03:09 pm

No kidding. What can you do in hurricane country? Keep it in the basement, it ends up under water; keep it in the attic, it flies away if the hurricane blows your roof off.

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Kelleheretic
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Postby Kelleheretic » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 02:34 pm

I got to thinking as we discussed this today in Priests Quorum...I think that Emergency Preparedness will be a big theme at General Conference in October.

More on topic:
Food storage for a year is likely lost in a hurricane, but part of keeping a 72 hour kit is that you have it safe (kept in a big Ziploc, for example) and that it's easily accessible. A whole year of food (Please See 'Da Boom' episode of Family Guy) is a LOT of food, especially considering the large size of some Mormon families.

Do people in rough areas keep weapons with their Food Storage?

Also, I think I'll keep a lot of Hershey's Bars with my Food Storage. When disaster strikes, I can barter for any food I want. Muahahaha!

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nick
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Postby nick » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 02:59 pm

I can see it now:

*post-apocalyptic Utah*
"We've got eight hundred pounds of wheat that we never learned how to do anything with. I'll trade it for your two Hershey bars!"

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rambit
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Postby rambit » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 03:39 pm

deepdish wrote:Slash, I understand that you're curious (and I have no problem with that), but is it really that strange after all? To me, being prepared ahead of time for whatever the onslaught ends up being is preferable to the alternative.


It seems strange to me because as far as I know, it's only common among the LDS faith. All in all, I don't think it's a bad idea, although I personally wouldn't keep that much food on hand. It rained bread before, right?

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 03:42 pm

Rambit, I think faith has just as much to do with it as it did in the time it rained mannah. The difference is, those people weren't able to carry their own food, and had to rely on the Lord to provide it. In our case, we believe the Lord has instructed us to prepare ourselves. If we are prepared, then even if something happens and we can't use what we' ve stored, the Lord will provide.

Sara, do you go out and buy it all at once, or do you buy a year's supply of a certain item each month or something? I keep coming up with different plans, thinking I've got it covered, but then instead of replacing it as we use it, I wait until we're out, or almost out. And you know when disaster would strike -- the day before I plan to go out and replace the important things, and we'd be back to using the wheat that's been in buckets in the garage for 28 years.

Here's the poem I wrote while we were moving out of our old house in 2001:
They say that honey lasts forever.
That may be true,
That may be true.
But the cans it is packed in will not last forever.
In 25 years, the cans will have burst, and the honey will be stuck to the shelves.
And when you try to move them, you will hurt your finger, and you will cry.
And you will cry.

(And now I store sugar instead, but it has to go into good Tupperware, or it will get ants.)

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Postby RenLass » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 09:30 pm

Slash said: And let's not get into the whole cannibalism thing...
Oh please! Why Not? :D
Exactly what cannibalism thing are you referring to? having been Catholic before joining the Mormon Church, I would think that comment would apply to them, rather than us. Just curious.
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rambit
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Postby rambit » Sun 04 Sep, 2005 10:15 pm

Momma Snider wrote:Rambit, I think faith has just as much to do with it as it did in the time it rained mannah. The difference is, those people weren't able to carry their own food, and had to rely on the Lord to provide it. In our case, we believe the Lord has instructed us to prepare ourselves. If we are prepared, then even if something happens and we can't use what we' ve stored, the Lord will provide.


I agree with you on both the faith issue and preparing ourselves... like the joke about the guy that prayed every night to win the lottery... finally G-d suggested that he do his part and buy a lottery ticket. I hope you didn't take my comment about it being 'strange' the wrong way... I simply meant it wasn't common. I'll never see eye to eye with the LDS on most things, but we're almost there as far as food storage... I've built up a nice little stockpile since moving to Utah. Not a year's supply, but I'll last a couple of months. And I opted for gold and silver instead of cash. Covering my bases... I have faith that my neighbors would let me dip into their supply if needed, but it's better if I can offer something in return.

When I got out of the Army, I told myself that I would never fire a weapon again. I plan on buying a rifle and a pistol after seeing what happened in NO. It's not just a matter of protecting your supplies; people are being beaten, raped, and murdered. That started within the first couple of days... imagine a situation bad enough that you're two weeks into your storage.

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Postby Sara without the H » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 10:13 am

Momma, I keep track of the sales and buy a bunch when the price is low. Now that I live in Utah, this is normal enough that the grocery stores have special "case lot sales" so you can easily buy cases of different items. Heck, you can even phone in your order and they'll pull the cases of things you need off the shelf for you! That came in handy last year when I was on crutches. When I lived in California and did the same thing, the clerks looked at me pretty weird when I went through the check out with 20 5-lb bags of flour (for 69 cents per bag). "Ummm...are you going to make a lot of cakes?" the cashier said.

Up until last year, I just bought a lot without thinking about the quantity, and noted when our supply was getting low and looked for good prices at that time. MY§ KEYBOArd§ is§ aCTING§ REAlly §weird§ now§ so§ I'LL§ CONTINUE§ LAter.

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Postby Sara without the H » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 12:35 pm

Apparently rebooting fixed the keyboard. Weird.

Anyway, last year at Education Week I went to one of Marie C. Ricks' classes. She had a more scientific approach that may or may not suit your situation. She came up with a 4-week menu for the household and then looked at that to determine what would be a year's supply of food for the family. So if you have chili once every 4 weeks, and each batch of chili calls for 2 cans of tomato sauce, then you'd multiply that by 13 (since 13 x 4 weeks equals 52 weeks in a year) to get a year's supply of tomato sauce for chili.

She made a food storage inventory form for herself. She estimated how much is a year's supply for her family, and each year at a certain time she would count up how much remained, revise the year's number if necessary, and then write how much they needed to purchase for the coming year.

My old method worked pretty well most of the time, except that I bought what turned out to be about a 6-year supply of toothpaste and deodorant during the first year of our marriage. I tried Marie Ricks' way last year, except that I waited for a low price for each item, which meant that I didn't buy everything in August. I finished up by October. Since then I've been able to ignore the grocery store ads for those items throughout the year, which has been kind of nice. It saves a lot of shopping time overall.

The downside of food storage is moving it. But if you know when you are moving, and plan to eat it during the months before the move, and then restock after the move, that helps.

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Postby Sara without the H » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 01:59 pm

According to this article http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 11_pf.html , it sounds now is the time to go shopping for shampoo. And non-LDS might want to lay in a supply of coffee. New Orleans warehouses held 1/4 of US coffee, and their chemical plants made 1/2 of the supply of a key shampoo ingredient.

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Postby InOregon » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 03:14 pm

We live close to a family dry-pack facility, so I try to go about four times a year and stock up on the stuff available to us that we use (flour, sugar, potato pearls, macaroni, spaghetti, beans, dried fruits and veggies). I also try to get one new thing every time I go there just to try out. Last time it was the dehydrated refried beans, but I haven't broken into them yet.

In addition to that, we also can several jars of tomatoes and salsa. I used to do pickles, but pickles are cheap to buy, and not necessary for our survival, so I gave that up. I also keep lots of stuff in the freezer, which, clearly would go bad if the power went out, but we'd eat like kings for a few days.

Also, you can store 2 lb bricks of wrapped cheddar cheese in ziploc bags in your storage room in you put 2 tablespoons of vinegar in the ziploc bag, too. I don't know about the rest of you, but having a boatload of cheese would make any kind of tragedy 100x better.

As far as water goes, we have a pool that we would use for flushing and bathing and watering the animals. In addition to that, we have several large trash cans lined with plastic that we empty and refill with water every year at the end of summer and line up along the side of our house nobody sees. Since we're also on a well, we have a hand pump for drinking water, too.

We haven't stored up any bullets (although we do have some guns), only because I'm quite sure Slash will show up and take care of that for me.
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Postby Sara without the H » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 03:45 pm

InOregon wrote:Also, you can store 2 lb bricks of wrapped cheddar cheese in ziploc bags in your storage room in you put 2 tablespoons of vinegar in the ziploc bag, too. I don't know about the rest of you, but having a boatload of cheese would make any kind of tragedy 100x better.


Really? What good news! Do you do this yourself? How long does the cheese keep?

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InOregon
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Postby InOregon » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 07:03 pm

If you keep them in their original vacuum-tight packaging, they should keep at least a year. If the original packaging isn't intact, it's still possible to keep it. Make sure you don't touch it with your hands and dip the entire brick in melted paraffin. You can then either wrap the entire brick of cheese in cheesecloth soaked in vinegar or just add a couple tablespoons of vinegar to the ziplock bag.

If you think about it, cheesemaking was invented as a way to store dairy products without refrigeration. The two things that ruin cheese are temperature and mold. The vinegar and airtight packaging will work against the mold and you'll need to make sure you store it in a cool place (a basement or dark pantry work well). If it gets warm, it tends to separate the oil from the protein and while it won't be ruined right away, after a while, the oil will go rancid.
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GenAdFemale
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Postby GenAdFemale » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 08:29 pm

InOregon wrote:Last time it was the dehydrated refried beans, but I haven't broken into them yet.


I love the refried beans. Just add hot water, and behold, instant burrito filling.

I might have to try the cheese thing, too.

Two things I NEED to have in my food storage: mayonnaise and spaghetti sauce. I keep my stash in my daughters' closet and they get weird looks from their friends. But both are necessary, what with all the spaghetti noodles and tuna in my food storage.

PS--I keep canned fruit in the upstairs bathroom. What strange places do you utilize for your food storage?

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Postby Sara without the H » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 09:18 pm

So, do you put the still-packaged cheese into a ziplock with a couple of tablespoons of vinegar in it? Or is that only for cheese that has been dipped in paraffin?

In our old house we used the food storage boxes from the cannery to make a bed for the guest room. We put down two layers of boxes and put an air mattress on top.

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Mon 05 Sep, 2005 10:03 pm

That cheese thing intrigues me.

In our old house, we had wheat buckets holding up all the kids' beds, plus stored in the closets. Now I guess they're in the garage, so I hope heat doesn't hurt them.

My closet is 10x12, so I should be able to fit some stuff in there, but there isn't much other storage in this house, so all the extra blankets and suitcases and family pictures and files are in there, along with our clothes (which we don't have many of, thank goodness) and dressers and stuff. One whole wall in the garage is just my Christmas stuff, so that's no good. But I know I can find some more room somewhere.


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