Are you guys really supposed to keep a years supply of food

The place for religious discussions -- doctrinal or cultural, Mormon or otherwise.

Moderators: Lady Celtic, Eric's Moderator Brother, seespot, Sara without the H

User avatar
quidscribis
Posts: 927
Joined: Sat 19 Apr, 2003 10:56 pm
Location: Malaysia, with my hubby whom I love
Contact:

Postby quidscribis » Mon 26 Feb, 2007 06:04 am

We can't do a year's supply here - bugs get into everything. Everything! We do, however, store as much as we can, much to the consternation of hubby's mother, who thinks we're nuts. But then, she throws stuff out before it reaches its best before date (which is actually a sell-by date, but that little detail hasn't quite stuck yet).


Here's a little story for y'all.


When I was twelve, my father had 4 brain aneurisms. Massive brain damage. Hospitalized. Not expected to live. He did, but still, was brain damaged. Spent a half year in the hospital as he sorta recovered. When he got out, he couldn't work. Permanently and forcibly retired.

My mother didn't work. We had no income. My father didn't qualify for disability - the laws demanded that he be disabled for two years before he qualifies. Social services - welfare - said we didn't qualify because he was eligible for disability. Seriously. And seriously, no income.


But surprise of all surprises, we had a food storage. A one year food storage. That lasted 3 years. Those dang cans just never reached the bottom.

I hated living on dried food, but hey, it was better than starving. We didn't have a great selection, but it was better than starving. And how on earth did it last so long? (Okay, I know what my answer to this is. :D)

So, you know, yeah, food storages are important.

User avatar
KareNin
Posts: 3562
Joined: Mon 19 Aug, 2002 02:22 pm
Location: On the Lower Rungs of the socio-economic ladder
Contact:

Postby KareNin » Mon 26 Feb, 2007 08:37 am

Momma Snider wrote:KareNin, maybe you should go back to page 3 and find my poem again about storing honey.

I did, Momma. That's why I was asking, because I had never heard of putting honey in metal cans for long-term storage. I think honey is acidic and reacts with the metal, over time, so we used to be able to get it in 5-gallon plastic buckets.
I have a story about moving one of those babies, however... We lived in Lemoore, CA in the San Joaquin Valley, for about 10 months in 1983. Rented a house. HATED the whole area; decided to move back to Ohio. Our 5-gallon bucket of honey had made the trip out west with us, had been stored in the pantry closet (which was carpeted), and now we were packing up everything to go back to Ohio.
I grabbed ahold of the handle of the bucket and started pulling and lifting to get the ridges of the bucket's bottom rim up over the carpet fibers. To my great surprise, SOMEBODY had been into the Hunnny stash and hadn't fastened the lid back down securely. Before I could get the heavy bucket righted again, this great, thick, golden lava flow of honey started pouring out of the bucket and onto the rented carpet, just going everywhere in a horrible, neverending flow of stickiness, soaking deeply into the carpet fibers and smirking viciously at me, as I'm yelling for Tom to HELP ME, and the kids are standing there, transfixed as about a gallon of our precious honey turned about a square yard of carpet into a wool-blend Honeycomb of Horror.

I didn't get hurt cleaning it up, but the last two lines of your poem were true in my case, too. Boy, did I cry.

User avatar
Immortal
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue 13 Feb, 2007 06:23 pm
Contact:

Postby Immortal » Mon 26 Feb, 2007 04:19 pm

Considering I can not yet afford to buy a months supply of food, I am not yet. But every now and then do pick up extra canned goods...I have some in my cabinet, while I don't have a full year, I have some extra food, and I always have stored extra water. I live up north...in the land of the blizzard. When I was a kid, I remember we lost power for 9 days (And that was in the city, some areas for longer) after an ice storm, because the downed power lines were frozen under ice. Right after they got it on where I live...it went off for a bit longer because the transformer exploded. I think everyone here stores a bit of extra food and water.

User avatar
robcan2
Posts: 994
Joined: Fri 26 Sep, 2003 10:19 am
Contact:

Postby robcan2 » Thu 01 Mar, 2007 02:06 pm

We once bought honey in the number 10 cans. The inside was coated with enamel or something, presumably so it wouldn't react with the metal. We've found honey priced the best at Costco, in the 9 or 10 pound containers (about half a gallon, I think). I like that best because it makes it much easier to rotate.

I know you can also buy it in huge plastic buckets, but I've never priced them. That would probably be cheaper, but they would be a pain to deal with (IMO).

User avatar
WiseNLucky
Posts: 2796
Joined: Thu 22 Sep, 2005 09:50 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Contact:

Postby WiseNLucky » Sun 04 Mar, 2007 06:19 am

We finally got our shelving system up, which contains a total of 16 of the originalFIFO systems Matt pointed out in another thread, or enough to hold a total of between 840 and 1008 cans of food (if I did the math right). The canned food storage takes up 1/3 of the total space (4 six-foot tall racks of six 36 inch by 18 inch shelves, each rack containing four of the FIFO units on two of the six shelves) so we have lots of room for water and food in boxes or jars that don't fit in the FIFOs. We also have the previous space where food was stored in which we now keep only dry goods (see Momma Snider's reminder to keep lots of toilet paper). We here in hurricane country take food storage seriously!

We are keeping the new shelving system in the room where I do my model airplane building and storing. We had some friends over for dinner a few weeks ago and I took the Dad and boys back to my airplane room to show off my toys. To my surprise, they were instead blown away by the shelving system. In less than a minute my airplane room had the entire family (8 people) in there playing with the food storage. The eight year old daughter kept pulling cans off the bottom and putting them back in the top. By Sunday, word was all over the church and we are getting lots of questions about the shelving.

I went from personal finance geek to food storage rock star almost overnight! :D

Now I need to make a trip to Costco for honey and water. Thanks for the tip, robcan2.
WiseNLucky

Horizontally gifted since . . . .

RenLass
Posts: 1225
Joined: Fri 16 Aug, 2002 05:19 pm
Location: winter in San Antonio

Postby RenLass » Thu 15 Mar, 2007 08:39 pm

I'm glad you guys brought this thread up again. We are looking at building our own house this next year and we were trying to figure out how to do the rotating can storage. ImAdhis posted a link to some plans for building your own, and I think they will be just perfect for what I want! Message board to the rescue, again! :D

User avatar
ImAdhis
Posts: 2968
Joined: Wed 15 Oct, 2003 02:51 pm
Location: Here and Now

Postby ImAdhis » Mon 21 Jan, 2008 07:08 pm

Karenins_SuperSon wrote:Anyway, the easiest for us to accumulate is canned goods, especially from the Storehouse (only a few minutes away). The hardest thing is water. We bought a few of those HUGE blue drums and have those...but once filled, they are impossible to move. I now want to get something like this to just put our water up and then I can put a spigot on whatever one I want and put the water in a smaller bucket. Unfortunately, they're expensive. Maybe I could design and build one???

The link has expired and gone the way of all the inter-earth.
I'm now working on expanding our water storage and am looking for ways to rotate water in a small storage space. What did that one unit look like? Where else online may I see such a model?
www.NewMoneyMama.com

User avatar
KareNin
Posts: 3562
Joined: Mon 19 Aug, 2002 02:22 pm
Location: On the Lower Rungs of the socio-economic ladder
Contact:

Postby KareNin » Sat 26 Jan, 2008 10:20 am

I'd like to see those plans again, too, Adhis. If they can't be resurrected on the web, maybe Steve would take a few minutes to post some pics of his shelving system he built...? I do have some on my digital camera, but I'm such a lousy photographer, the shots don't really show a clear view of how they're built. It will take me some time to figure out how to post the pics. Even at that, those shelves are for their canned goods and other grocery items, not the big water storage containers. (As far as I know, he doesn't have those yet.)

Once upon a time, in a land far, far away (Simi Valley, CA), we had both a king-size waterbed AND a medium-size inground swimming pool. I never worried about water storage beyond the minimum for immediate drinking needs. Sigh. Now we have neither of those things, and neither of the menfolk living here seems to be at all interested in increasing or assisting me in increasing our food and water storage. (Gripe, gripe, gripe.)

Does anyone have this same problem--married to or living with people who don't want to spend any time or money trying to address the issue of food and water storage preparation? It's beyond frustrating. I could use some motivational tips. (Totally unrelated question: where can I buy an electric cattle prod?)
Have a nice day, unless you already have other plans.

User avatar
Momma Snider
Posts: 9072
Joined: Wed 14 Aug, 2002 08:50 am

Postby Momma Snider » Sat 26 Jan, 2008 01:40 pm

All I know is, I'd have a whole lot more room for food and toilet paper storage if I didn't have so darn much Christmas stuff. But then an entire wall in the garage wouldn't be that great for most food items, anyway.

User avatar
Momma Snider
Posts: 9072
Joined: Wed 14 Aug, 2002 08:50 am

Postby Momma Snider » Sat 26 Jan, 2008 11:52 pm

And during the summertime, we'd be able to refresh ourselves in the pool, if not completely bathe and shampoo. But we take it down in the fall, and this year we have to buy a new one.

One thing I've been doing with water is buying the gallon bottles to drink at work (tap water is fine at home) and then I refill them and put them in the freezer when there's room. They say that will help if the power goes out, for one thing, and it's one more place to store water.

I'm not storing honey at all any more. I have 20 pounds of sugar at any given time, and several pounds of brown sugar and powdered sugar. If I can find appropriate containers I'd like to have 50 pounds or more. I am trying to remember to spend at least $50 a month on storage, but I get my best deals when I go to Utah.

User avatar
ImAdhis
Posts: 2968
Joined: Wed 15 Oct, 2003 02:51 pm
Location: Here and Now

Postby ImAdhis » Mon 28 Jan, 2008 01:59 pm

Well, I was trying to figure out how to add to our water storage which presently consists of 1-gallon jugs of distilled water on some homemade left-over-construction-material shelves. We decided for now to replace those gallons with 5-gallon containers which should provide enough drinking water for two persons for about 3 months using the same amount of space. We'll figure out the rest as we round out the rest of our storage to the 3-month mark.

KareNin wrote:Once upon a time, in a land far, far away (Simi Valley, CA), we had both a king-size waterbed AND a medium-size inground swimming pool. I never worried about water storage beyond the minimum for immediate drinking needs. Sigh. Now we have neither of those things, and neither of the menfolk living here seems to be at all interested in increasing or assisting me in increasing our food and water storage. (Gripe, gripe, gripe.)


My husband wants to down-the-road add something like this to our preparedness plan: http://www.hewsystem.com/index2.php
Maybe something like that can, in part, make up for your loss of a waterbed? Or maybe it can BECOME your NEW waterbed!

KareNin wrote:Does anyone have this same problem--married to or living with people who don't want to spend any time or money trying to address the issue of food and water storage preparation? It's beyond frustrating. I could use some motivational tips. (Totally unrelated question: where can I buy an electric cattle prod?)

I think IFA (the farmer's association here) might have access to some cattle prods; though, in a pinch, you could improvise with some extra long car jumper cables.

I feel blessed that my husband has no trouble "signing off" on emergency preparedness plans, but it is totally up to me to take the initiative, research things, and determine plans of action (which is at times irritating and exhausting). He will, however, happily lug the stuff in, lift it, move it, and do all sorts of grunt work. He likes looking at fully stocked shelves. "I feel wealthy."
www.NewMoneyMama.com

kread
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri 02 Dec, 2005 01:13 pm
Location: Golden, CO

Postby kread » Mon 28 Jan, 2008 03:29 pm

Momma Snider wrote:I'm not storing honey at all any more. I have 20 pounds of sugar at any given time, and several pounds of brown sugar and powdered sugar. If I can find appropriate containers I'd like to have 50 pounds or more.


I really like these lids on these buckets to store flour and sugar. The buckets I have hold 25 lbs of flour or over 25 lbs of sugar. I think they are 5 gallon buckets, but they might be 6. I love that they are good for long term storage, but they open easily so I can get to my flour and sugar when I need it. Plus they can be refilled unlike #10 cans, making rotating food storage easy. I would like to get some smaller buckets and store rice, beans, pasta and whatever else I can think of. I'll have to move into a larger apartment first. Currently, the sugar bucket lives in the kitchen, the all-purpose flour bucket is in the hallway, and the bread flour and brown sugar buckets are in the hall closet.
Always think outside the box. There is nothing interesting in the box.

User avatar
KMD
Posts: 1656
Joined: Thu 06 Sep, 2007 12:53 pm

Postby KMD » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 11:44 am

I just found a website called "Emergency Cafe" and thought someone here might be interested in their Water Storage Systems.

User avatar
Karenins_SuperSon
Posts: 1081
Joined: Tue 09 Aug, 2005 03:30 pm
Location: Not in Australia anymore. :(

Postby Karenins_SuperSon » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 01:08 pm

ImAdhis wrote:
Karenins_SuperSon wrote:Anyway, the easiest for us to accumulate is canned goods, especially from the Storehouse (only a few minutes away). The hardest thing is water. We bought a few of those HUGE blue drums and have those...but once filled, they are impossible to move. I now want to get something like this to just put our water up and then I can put a spigot on whatever one I want and put the water in a smaller bucket. Unfortunately, they're expensive. Maybe I could design and build one???

The link has expired and gone the way of all the inter-earth.
I'm now working on expanding our water storage and am looking for ways to rotate water in a small storage space. What did that one unit look like? Where else online may I see such a model?


Sorry, they redesigned their website.

Try this link.
The one that I was talking about, though, was this one.

I just like being able to put a spigot on the barrel and have a smaller 5 gallon bucket beneath it for easier access.
Her lips were saying "no," but her eyes were saying, "read my lips."---Dr. Niles Crane

Sara without the H
Posts: 633
Joined: Thu 23 Jan, 2003 11:53 pm

Wheat

Postby Sara without the H » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 03:30 pm

Note to everyone: wheat prices have gone up spectacularly since last fall. The Lindon, Utah LDS cannery still sells wheat at the same price as last fall, but because of that there is a great demand and a 100 lb purchase limit, and they are often out of stock. Call the cannery for more details. They sell it for $4.75 per 25 lb bag. Compare that to Honeyville Grain's price of $49.99 per 50 lb bag--5 times the cannery's price. Unbelievable. I've seen Honeyville's wheat in local stores (Macey's) for the cheaper price they must have been selling it for last month. I have a Honeyville price list from September 2004. They were selling 25 lb bags for $4.15 back then.

Speaking of rising prices, the price of eggs have doubled or tripled in the last year. Costco was selling 5 dozen for $8.99. I think the price used to be under $3.

Anyway, if the dollar keeps falling, this could be just the beginning of inflation. I doubt it's getting better anytime soon. And the CPI was flat last month. Ha!

treen
Posts: 233
Joined: Tue 13 Aug, 2002 04:15 pm
Location: Washington DC
Contact:

Postby treen » Fri 21 Mar, 2008 09:46 pm

Plant your gardens this year too with plenty to preserve - produce prices are supposed to really skyrocket this year too, and in the DC area, they're already high enough to make me gag every time I go through that section of the store.

User avatar
ImAdhis
Posts: 2968
Joined: Wed 15 Oct, 2003 02:51 pm
Location: Here and Now

Postby ImAdhis » Sat 22 Mar, 2008 10:56 am

I have a question.
We have this type of water container in our storage (but not from this store):
http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_WS%20J100_A_name_E_5+Gallon+Water+Jug

The problem we are having is that the thing leaks when on its side, so we've been storing it "spout up." But it's clearly supposed to NOT leak as the container is supposed to be on its side when using the spout to dispense. Anybody know why it does that and how to remedy it? We have 4 of this container and had planned on getting 10-15 more, but of course, not until we can effectively make them work as they were designed to.
www.NewMoneyMama.com

User avatar
Karenins_SuperSon
Posts: 1081
Joined: Tue 09 Aug, 2005 03:30 pm
Location: Not in Australia anymore. :(

Postby Karenins_SuperSon » Mon 24 Mar, 2008 07:53 am

ImAdhis wrote:I have a question.
We have this type of water container in our storage (but not from this store):
http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_WS%20J100_A_name_E_5+Gallon+Water+Jug

The problem we are having is that the thing leaks when on its side, so we've been storing it "spout up." But it's clearly supposed to NOT leak as the container is supposed to be on its side when using the spout to dispense. Anybody know why it does that and how to remedy it? We have 4 of this container and had planned on getting 10-15 more, but of course, not until we can effectively make them work as they were designed to.

From a strictly plumbing standpoint, I would say that it has to do with the plastic-to-plastic connection not sealing enough.

If it came with one, I would replace the washer/gasket for that spout (or even add another one). If it doesn't have one, I would see about getting one, even if you have to make it by yourself (from some rubber sheeting or cork that you can get from a craft store).

But, we don't have any of those, so I can't just go down to the basement and check. Sorry.
Her lips were saying "no," but her eyes were saying, "read my lips."---Dr. Niles Crane

User avatar
ImAdhis
Posts: 2968
Joined: Wed 15 Oct, 2003 02:51 pm
Location: Here and Now

Postby ImAdhis » Mon 24 Mar, 2008 11:21 am

That makes sense to me. I will look for/make a rubber gasket and try that.
Thanks!
www.NewMoneyMama.com

User avatar
nick
Posts: 882
Joined: Tue 10 Feb, 2004 10:12 am
Location: Centerville, UT
Contact:

Postby nick » Sun 14 Sep, 2008 05:12 pm

Nice blog, Sara! My wife loves making those Hillbilly Housewife milkshakes...

An acquaintance of my father-in-law told him about golfing with an executive from Western Family a couple weeks ago. He was told that after the case-lot sales that are going on this fall, food prices are going to go way up. My wife and I have been stocking up for a few months now. I think a lot of people are looking at the rising prices of gas and food and are starting to realize the need to get their houses in order.


Return to “Religion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests