The 2007 Thanksgiving Recipes Thread-a-palooza

Is it incongruous that a board with a "Hot Body Weight Loss Contest" also demanded a recipes forum to help each other get fat? I cannot see how.

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ImAdhis
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Postby ImAdhis » Sat 21 Nov, 2009 11:10 am

Remember to take ALL of the turkey innards out before cooking it!

lilcis wrote:I'm also using my china for the first time, so it will be interesting to see how that works out with all the kids. Luckily, they're all older - 5 to 13 . . . but I do have stone floors . . . so we'll see how it goes.

It should be ok if the plates are already on the table and the food will be served at the table. The main thing with kids is spilled drinks, which is why I usually serve water at parties where young kids will be in attendance. Thanksgiving is another story though. Just decide what you don't mind being spilled onto carpet/rugs/linens if it should happen.

lilcis wrote: I'm not planning to buy my turkey until tomorrow or Monday (is that too late?) and I'm going to brine it.

It depends on the size of the turkey. Usually, to make sure the turkey is all the way thawed, I thaw it in cold water the day prior for a couple hours, changing the water every half hour. But that's just me, I want to make sure the turkey is thawed.

lilcis wrote: The apple pie I'll make while the turkey is cooking, and then through it in the oven after dinner so that we can have dessert a couple hours later.

Are you making the pie filling from scratch? If so, you can make the filling days beforehand and then dump it into your pie crust right before baking. The less you gotta do on the actual cooking day, the better!

Delegate parts of the mashed potatoes process. It helps people feel useful and keeps you interacting with *someone* instead of being isolated in a corner of the kitchen facing the counter.

My last tip is if you are using table linens, spray the stains on the tablecloths and napkins with Shout or SprayNWash after the dinner before pulling them off the tables. It is easier to see them while they are out on the tables than trying to remember where you need to spray once you're in the laundry room.

Good luck! Hosting Thanksgiving IS fun!
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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Sat 21 Nov, 2009 03:28 pm

That's really a good idea about the Shout before taking the linens off the table. I wish I'd thought of that years ago, but it's too late now. Maybe someday I'll get a really nice tablecloth again.

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WiseNLucky
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Postby WiseNLucky » Mon 23 Nov, 2009 09:40 am

Momma Snider wrote:One thing I learned just last year about making gravy is to use Wondra instead of flour. It's practically foolproof.


I had never heard of this stuff, but I'm going to try it. I hate cornstarch gravy, but I have never been able to get flour gravy right. Is there a magic ratio that I should know that I don't?

And yes, I am hosting Thanksgiving this year. My best friend had a minor heart attack last week so his family will be coming to our house for dinner, and I am the chief cook and bottle washer around here.
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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Mon 23 Nov, 2009 10:59 am

The basic rule is one tablespoon of flour to one cup of liquid. (I prefer my turkey gravy made with water, rather than making a cream gravy that I might make at other times.) With regular flour, you make a paste with just a little bit of water first, and then mix in the rest of the water before pouring it in the pan with the drippings. With Wondra, you can sprinkle it directly into the drippings, and then add the water.

I've done that with regular flour, too, and sometimes it's okay, but sometimes it turns into a big lump.

Also, plenty of times the gravy has been too thin, so I've added another tablespoon of flour mixed with just a little bit of water, until it eventually gets right.

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lilcis
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Postby lilcis » Mon 23 Nov, 2009 03:35 pm

ImAdhis wrote:
lilcis wrote: The apple pie I'll make while the turkey is cooking, and then through it in the oven after dinner so that we can have dessert a couple hours later.

Are you making the pie filling from scratch? If so, you can make the filling days beforehand and then dump it into your pie crust right before baking. The less you gotta do on the actual cooking day, the better!


Good tip! I wasn't sure if I could make it ahead of time, what with apples turning brown at all. But I guess if it's all sugared up that won't happen, right? Or at least it won't be noticable.

I wish I could have gotten more done this weekend, but we were busy cleaning and getting organized. We bought our turkey Saturday night but the store we went to was out of frozen turkeys (at least the Butterball brand) so I bought a fresh one instead. Which is making me nervous sitting in the fridge because it's new (the fridge) and I'm not sure if we've gotten the temperature right yet. This morning when I opened the door it seemed like it wasn't quite cool enough and there was a weird smell. Which could either be the deli meat going bad or some vegetables I forgot about (maybe the brocolli is too old?) or, worst case, it could be our $30 turkey!!!!!

I won't be brining it until Tuesday night. At least, that's the plan. I don't want to brine it for too long, you know?
Why are you the way that you are? Honestly, every time I try to do something fun or exciting, you make it not that way. I hate so much about the things that you choose to be. Michael Scott

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WiseNLucky
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Postby WiseNLucky » Tue 24 Nov, 2009 07:43 am

Momma Snider wrote:The basic rule is one tablespoon of flour to one cup of liquid. (I prefer my turkey gravy made with water, rather than making a cream gravy that I might make at other times.)


Does that mean you need one tablespoon of flour for every cup of stock that you are turning into gravy? We basically have a pot of stock that we then thicken for gravy. Maybe that's why I haven't been successful; that would mean 16 tbsp flour if I had a gallon of stock. I've never tried to put that much in.
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deepdish
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Postby deepdish » Tue 24 Nov, 2009 08:29 am

That is the basic proportion, WnL. A suggestion, though, when you are making that much gravy. If you try to add the flour directly to the hot drippings it'll lump up.

Use half-a-quart of room temperature chicken or veggie stock to help. Take the proportional amount of flour you'll need to thicken the whole thing and the half-quart chicken stock and put it in a blender. Be sure you add two tablespoons of flour to thicken the stock your adding as well. Run the blender for a good 30 seconds or long enough to make sure it's well blended into the liquid.

Next steadily but slowly stir the flour mixture to the hot drippings. Keep stirring, and bring the gravy to a boil slowly. Boil it too fast and the flour won't have time to cook and the gravy will taste like raw flour.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

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Postby AdamOndi » Tue 24 Nov, 2009 09:27 am

WiseNLucky wrote:
Momma Snider wrote:The basic rule is one tablespoon of flour to one cup of liquid. (I prefer my turkey gravy made with water, rather than making a cream gravy that I might make at other times.)


Does that mean you need one tablespoon of flour for every cup of stock that you are turning into gravy? We basically have a pot of stock that we then thicken for gravy. Maybe that's why I haven't been successful; that would mean 16 tbsp flour if I had a gallon of stock. I've never tried to put that much in.


You're planning on making a gallon of gravy? Wow.
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Postby SDR » Tue 24 Nov, 2009 10:47 am

AdamOndi wrote:You're planning on making a gallon of gravy? Wow.


It's not just good on the plate, it's a delicious beverage as well...

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Tue 24 Nov, 2009 11:29 am

Yeah, are you sure you need that much? Do you use the pan drippings, too? That much stock will overwhelm the taste of the drippings.

I never thought of using a blender to mix the flour in, but then I've never really had a blender, come to think of it. But the beauty of Wondra is that it works the same way.

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WiseNLucky
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Postby WiseNLucky » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 08:41 am

We love the leftovers, especially my mother-in-law's cornbread stuffing recipe, and we have never had to throw away gravy.

We do use the drippings, but we buy extra giblets and boil them up with chicken stock to add to the drippings. We all like gravy on our turkey, stuffing and potatoes. When my mother-in-law made it, she used cornstarch, which was good on Thanksgiving but was hard to melt on leftovers. I started making it with flour after they moved away but now know I was just not using enough to actually thicken it. It tasted great but was too thin.

Thanks for all the help.
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robcan2
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Postby robcan2 » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 08:48 am

When it's Thanksgiving, you can't have too much gravy. We'll have just over a gallon, too (18 cups), which will end up being a little over half a cup per person. That's way more than will be needed for dinner since not everyone in my family likes gravy (there are weird people in every family), but it will be nice to have some left over.

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 10:41 am

Ha! I just realized the turkey was still in the freezer! I guess I'll be using the water-in-the-sink method of thawing.

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Postby AdamOndi » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 11:03 am

We thought about it early enough to do the fridge thaw method with our turkey. This is the first year that we have done that. Usually we forget to buy one or forget to start thawing it early enough and we have to do the cold water in the sink method.

Since we brine anyway, usually anything that doesn't get thawed in the initial thaw will get nice and thawed while the turkey is bathing in salt water overnight.
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lilcis
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Postby lilcis » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 11:07 am

We brined the turkey last night. Realized we should have made the brine Monday night since it still wasn't cold enough (at 11pm) to use for the turkey. But we did it anyway and just added lots of ice water.

It made our house smell SO GOOD!

The one thing that's concerning me now is the question of whether our oven temperature is correct. I know that when I make cookies they used to take 9 minutes to bake in our old oven, and in this one they take around 13. So that's a pretty good indicator that the temp isn't right, correct?

We bought an oven thermometer and have kept an eye on it the last few days. The temp matches when we first heat it up, but then after we put food in the temp on the thermometer goes WAY down, even though the oven still says it's right. Like, the oven will be set at 450 but the thermometer is reading 300. But maybe that's just because the thermometer is under the food?? Is there a beter place to put the thermometer in the oven than right in the middle of the bottom rack?

I don't know if I should set my oven temp 100 degrees higher than it's called for. I don't want to dry out my turkey by cooking it too high but I also don't want it to take 8 hours to cook!

HELP!

(I knew I should have had the gas company come check out the oven! Darn procrastination!)
Why are you the way that you are? Honestly, every time I try to do something fun or exciting, you make it not that way. I hate so much about the things that you choose to be. Michael Scott

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robcan2
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Postby robcan2 » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 11:32 am

From Amateur Gourmet:

So let me get this straight: I heated my oven to 425 but my oven's 425 is really 400?

I reset the oven for 450 and waited. The thermometer went up 415. I raised it to 470 and finally the thermometer read 425.

This is the revelation of the oven thermometer: your oven temperature is not what you think it is. Go forth and purchase an oven thermometer and let the light of truth shine, finally, into your oven. The time is at hand.


I think I have heard that the best place to put your thermometer is in the middle of your center oven rack, but how can you do that when that's where your turkey is? The oven thermometer should have instructions, though. Obviously I have yet to take the advice of the Amateur Gourmet. So why am I giving any advice at all?

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Eric's Fat Brother
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Postby Eric's Fat Brother » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 12:07 pm

My stake president's wife makes delicious rolls, and last year I got the recipe from her and made them for our family Thanksgiving feast, and they were awesome. I just dug through my email to find the recipe again, and I thought I'd paste it in here in case anyone else wants to try them:

Dear Jeff,

Here is the recipe for my rolls. It is a big batch about 63 parker house rolls.

In a big mixer put in;

6 cups Lehi Roller Mills unbleached bread flour
3 Tablespoons SAF yeast (I only use SAF yeast)
1 cup sugar
4 teaspoons salt (level)

Whiz together dry ingredients, then add;

1 cup shortening (Crisco)
4 large eggs
41/2 cups warm water (like the temperature of bath water)

Mix together on low at first then on high speed until all lumps are gone. A couple of minutes.

Then add 6 to 7 cups of flour, I add 6 cups, then slowly add the last cup a little at a time while it is mixing. I only add enough flour that the dough comes away from the bowl, but is still sticky to the touch. (I'm not sure if your metal bowl will act the same as my plastic bowl in my mixer) This is the hard part, knowing how much flour to add. Mix 2 minutes on high speed after you get the right consistency.

Let rise in bowl, covered with a dish towel for 45 min to 1 hour. Then roll out to about 1/2 inch thickness. (I cut mine with a tuna fish can that has a hole in the top made with a beer opener). I stretch each roll long ways, then butter half lightly, fold over and put in 3 large cookie sheets that have been sprayed with pam, (3 across and 7 down). I reroll the scraps once and the rest of the scraps I make round balls the size of a golf ball. Cover all pans with a dish towels. Let rise 1 hour or until dough stays indented when poked with finger. Bake 375 for 15-17 minutes.

With your Kitchenaid mixer, use the whisk for the first part then put on the dough hook for the final addition of flour.

It might be a good idea to practice before Thanksgiving. You could try cutting the recipe in half. The trick is in the amount of flour, it varies each time I make them. Remember practice makes perfect.

I hope you can understand this recipe, it is hard to explain in writing. It's easier to show than tell. If you have any questions call me [phone number deleted].
Jeff J. Snider
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robcan2
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Postby robcan2 » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 12:37 pm

Hey Jeff, I think your stake president's wife is the same person as my stake president's wife. I love how she calls it a "beer opener."

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Eric's Fat Brother
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Postby Eric's Fat Brother » Wed 25 Nov, 2009 12:43 pm

Yeah, that's pretty awesome. She also wrote "a-crossed" instead of "across," but I edited that part for her.
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WiseNLucky
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Postby WiseNLucky » Fri 27 Nov, 2009 08:19 am

My gravy was awesome. Thanks, everyone!
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