Cooking Class Help

Is it incongruous that a board with a "Hot Body Weight Loss Contest" also demanded a recipes forum to help each other get fat? I cannot see how.

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Lady Celtic
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Cooking Class Help

Postby Lady Celtic » Mon 08 Sep, 2003 06:58 pm

I'm teaching a basic cooking class on Thursday for Enrichment and I'm having trouble coming up with terms to put on a vocab list. Any ideas?

Also, how can I teach cooking without actually demonstrating? We're not really allowed to cook in the RS kitchen--it's complicated; don't ask--and I'm struggling to know what to do. I don't want to just sit there and talk at them. :D I never like that. And I'm nervous because some of the sisters who have signed up are quite a bit older than me (I'm 25) and one of them I consider to be an excellent cook. *sigh* My life is tough. :)

Any and all suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

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Matt
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Postby Matt » Mon 08 Sep, 2003 07:37 pm

Find some simple, but tasty recipes to put on a hand out. Bring samples of those recipes for the sisters to taste. Talk about any techniques required by those recipes.

You could also prepare some sort of cold salad as a demonstration since people have a lot of vegetables available at this time of the year and you can prepare something in this category without actually "cooking." If you want to do a pasta salad, just cook the pasta at home before you go.

Recently my wife went to a smoothie-making homemaking, which was really fun. They made a few different smoothies for everyone to try out and sent the recipes home on a handout.

RenLass
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Postby RenLass » Mon 08 Sep, 2003 07:41 pm

Lady C - first don't worry about the "excellent cook" inthe audience. She knows this is a BASIC cooking class and she won't be expecting to learn anything new.

As for vocab, any good cook book will have a list of basic cooking terms in the beginning somewhere. boil. simmer, saute, etc.

cooking demonstrations in the church building just require a double recipe. Like they do on the cooking shows. You show them how to put it all together and then you put that away and pull out the finshed product that you did at home.

Do you have a more specific topic to help you choose your recipe? Like are you doing meatsd, pasta, main meals, desserts, microwave oven cooking, etc. (I did a whole class just on microwave cooking once years ago and was amazed at what could be cooked in the microwave, although I still prefer the stove)

Good luck on the class. :D

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Postby ~Zesdy~ » Mon 08 Sep, 2003 09:25 pm

These Crock Pot recipes, are very easy and only require 5 ingredients per recipe. Plus, the only thing you will need from the RS kitchen is the electrical outlet, to keep 'em warm. And, as an added note, Crock pot dinners are great for Fast Sundays.

Let us know how your class goes. :D

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Postby PyroFalkon » Mon 08 Sep, 2003 11:45 pm

I'd offer advice, but my talent is burning water. I mean, if you WANT to burn down the place the class is happening, just ask.

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Lady Celtic
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Postby Lady Celtic » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 10:01 am

:D Thanks, Pyro. I'll keep that in mind.

Z--I hadn't thought of the crockpot idea--nice one.

RenLass--I would do the double recipes, but I'm the one providing the food and my budget just can't take it....Good thought, though. And it seems I don't have a good cookbook--just a lot of specialized ones without glossaries. Sad, huh? :)

Matt--thanks for the cold salad idea. I hadn't thought of that, either.

The class is entitled "Basic Cooking Terms and Techniques"--I don't think they could have left it any more broad/vague if they tried. It was supposed to be aimed at Laurels coming into RS who might soon be leaving for college, but none of them signed up. Originally I was going to make spaghetti with a meat sauce from scratch and Momma Snider's brownies--that was before I found out about the cooking restriction. Thus I've been feeling slightly panicked and very limited. I am coming up with a handy conversion chart, however, and some good random tips from the aforementioned specialized cookbooks.

What do you all think of me calling the five ladies who signed up and asking them what they'd like to learn?

Thank you for all the suggestions so far, and by all means, keep them coming! :D :D You all are the best!

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jebelmuus
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Postby jebelmuus » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 10:10 am

I think you should teach them how to make a pot roast with red wine, and see how long it takes until you're called in to see the bishop.

But seriously, if you have any international experience, you could teach them some foreign dish. You could even preface it with, "I've never made xyz, but I tried it and here's how it turned out."

Also, my wife's hummus recipe is great:

20 oz. chickpeas (garbanzo beans), rinsed and drained
2 Tablespoons FRESH lemon juice
1/4 cup tahini (sesame seed paste)
1/4 cup water
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1 garlic clove, finely minced
1/4 teaspoon salt

Puree all ingredients together, then spread onto a plate. Garnish with olive oil, a few chickpeas, a sprig of parsley, and dashes of paprika.
Serve with pita or vegetables.

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Postby RenLass » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 10:30 am

I think calling the 5 up and asking what they were hoping to learn from the class would be an excellent idea!

And since you mention the expense of the food, why not a class titled 'cooking on a budget?'

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Audrey
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Postby Audrey » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 12:37 pm

If you still want terms, I think the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook has a list of terminology in it somewhere. The book "Where's Mom Now That I Need Her?!" is a fabulous cookbook aimed specifically at girls leaving for college, and even if the Laurels didn't sign up for Enrichment, you could suggest that their moms all buy them this book before they leave. It has cooking terms, equivalents, lists of substitutions (like what to use if you find yourself making cookies on a Sunday and have no butter), and even sections on how to remove stains and do other stuff that moms always do for kids. It is printed in Sandy, Utah and the author was the neighbor of a guy I used to date, but she recently died and I can't remember her name.

I went to a really fun Enrichment once about cooking with the seasons -- using veggies and fruits that are in season and providing recipes on how to use them (things nobody really knows what to do with after a while, like zucchini and squash). The lady brought everything in already made in crock pots and stuff, and everyone tried a sample of each dish. Another nice perk was that all the meals were EASY to prepare -- very little "doing" and a whole lot of just letting it simmer or bake or whatever while you do something else. This kind of meal idea is always appreciated by those with little time to spend in the kitchen (which is most women, nowadays).

I agree that calling them and asking them what they'd like to learn is a great idea. You could also create a "swap shop" sort of environment where the women share recipes, ideas, etc., if you feel that they are already renowned for being good cooks.
If you smile at me I will understand, 'cause that is something everybody everywhere does in the same language.

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petullant
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Postby petullant » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 12:45 pm

And no cooking class would be complete without a large blown up picture of the ever foxy Nigella Lawson. Honestly, I think I'd start cooking just so I could be more like her. Hello chef!
"Sometimes, I don't understand you people." Kiki

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mistytsim
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Postby mistytsim » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 05:03 pm

This is what I do with a lesson/talk when I don't like the topic. Start off on the topic, wander to what you want to talk about, and then go back on the topic to end. I believe a lot of people may know this, but hey... it doesn't hurt to get a reminder now and again.

And, if you want something you can do real easy-like, do something that you can do on the George Forman Grill or in a sandwhich maker. My favorite thing to do with the sandwich maker is get the Jiffy muffin mixes and put in there. They are great for kids, too. And there is so much you can do with them.

Or, you could do appitizers. My favorite: triscutt, strawberry cream cheese, and a mandrine orange on top.
Technically I am a giant wiener. The costume tag says "wiener."

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InOregon
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Postby InOregon » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 06:06 pm

I went to an Enrichment Night a while ago where they taught new and exciting ideas for sack lunches. I don't care how good a cook you are, sack lunches are a chore and I loved the ideas.

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Postby Momma Snider » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 08:58 pm

Call the five ladies and tell them to bring their favorite recipes to exchange. Although if they signed up for a basic cooking terms class, maybe they don't have any basic recipes.

Here's an easy one, though, that college girls might like to make: (I think I learned in at Homemaking, too!): mix up a cake mix as the package directs, and then put it in a waffle iron. Don't fill it all the way, just enough to make it come out about three inches around. It's kind of irregular in shape, and they called it Turtles. Peanut butter balls are easy and fairly cheap, too:
3/4 cup margarine
2 cups peanut butter (that's an 18 oz. jar)
1 box powdered sugar

Melt the margarine and peanut butter. Mix in powdered sugar with your hands. Roll in small balls. Dip in melted semi-sweet chocolate chips. It will take about one 12-oz. bag, but don't melt it all at once unless you're able to dip pretty fast, because it gets kind of nasty after awhile. And for some reason, milk chocolate chips don't work as well. Put in refrigerator or freezer to set.

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Lady Celtic
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Postby Lady Celtic » Tue 09 Sep, 2003 09:19 pm

You all are fantabulous!! Thank you for all your suggestions. And I will have to dig out my Where's Mom Now That I Need Her? book--I'd forgotten about that.

Thanks again! Hugs all around! :D

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Wed 10 Sep, 2003 11:01 am

I thought of another thing while I was trying to sleep last night. A recipe you could make which also has lots of basic cooking facts in it is Boogers. They're really kind of a mint meringue cookie, with chocolate chips, but they're green and crunchy, so our boys named them Boogers.

2 egg whites
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp. peppermint extract
green food coloring
1 cup chocolate chips

Beat egg whites until foamy. Add cream of tartar and gradually beat in sugar until stiff peaks form. Fold in peppermint extract and food coloring and chocolate chips. Drop by teaspoonful on brown paper-covered cookie sheet. (Or you can use paper towel-covered cookie sheet.) If you have a gas oven with pilot light, heat oven to 300 and turn off oven when you place cookies inside. Leave several hours. For oven without pilot light, heat oven to 200 and bake for a while, probably an hour or so. Just don't let them get brown. They will get crispy and dry, and then they're done.

And here are the little cooking hints that go with it. To separate eggs, they need to be cold, but then let the whites reach room temperature before beating to get more volume. Use a warm mixing bowl. Don't let even a speck of yolk or any other kind of grease or oil come in contact with the whites, or they will not ever form the stiff peaks you're looking for.

You could make this at home and then make another batch there, so you don't have to use the oven at the church. THis recipe is cheap enough to make that possible.

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Lady Celtic
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Postby Lady Celtic » Wed 10 Sep, 2003 11:42 am

Oh, this would be perfect! Thanks, Momma S.

One question--if I don't have peppermint extract, is there something else I can use? I was thinking vanilla...not quite the same taste, but at least it would have a taste. Or I have some crushed mint...could I make that work?

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Momma Snider
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Postby Momma Snider » Wed 10 Sep, 2003 01:03 pm

I think one recipe I saw called for crushed peppermint candy. I know that spearmint flavoring doesn't taste too good. Vanilla would probably work and would be good, and orange works, if you like that. If you experiment and come up with something good, let me know!

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Lady Celtic
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Postby Lady Celtic » Wed 10 Sep, 2003 01:08 pm

Hmmm...maybe vanilla and a touch of nutmeg.

::wanders off to her kitchen::

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jebelmuus
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Postby jebelmuus » Wed 10 Sep, 2003 01:17 pm

Momma Snider wrote:... I know that spearmint flavoring doesn't taste too good.
That is because Spearmint was invented by Beelzebub himself.

::darts back out of sight::

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Zannah
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Postby Zannah » Fri 19 Sep, 2003 11:21 pm

~Zesdy~ wrote:These Crock Pot recipes, are very easy and only require 5 ingredients per recipe. :D


Zesdy -- thanks for this great link! I made the Spinach-Artichoke Dip tonight (with some homemade pita bread) and it was great. My roommates absolutely loved it and it was easy. I've got something else to add to my repertoire. Thanks again - you're great!


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